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Consecration Of Tools

Typically as you collect tools for use in ritual, you will need to consecrate them. Just what is consecration, and how do you do it?

The dictionary defines consecration as “dedication to the service and worship of a deity”. So in plain English, you are ritually setting an object aside for the express use for worship of the Gods.

This concept of consecrating tools is relatively new as far as Witchcraft is concerned. It has also lead to some odd and interesting ideas on what a ritual tool must be.

There are many books that tell you that an Athame must be a black handled, double edged knife. While this may be considered traditional, as with most everything else in the Craft, it really comes down to what you feel is right for you.

What do you believe your Athame must look like? Do you really need that $200 hand forged, Damascus steel blade for your ritual knife, or will that cheap knock off from Pakistan, you found at ARC do?

Remember, the tool on its own has no power what so ever. The tool is simply a tool, a prop. All the tools you ever really need, you were born with.

There are people out there, especially those new to the Craft, who seem to believe the more expensive the tool, the better. If you can afford it, there’s no reason not to spend big bucks on tools, but you don’t need to.

A Witches tools are very personal objects. Understanding your tools and how to properly use them, is one of the most important aspects of Witchcraft. What you don't know about tools, may cause problems with your rituals or magick...

A better way to choose tools is to wait for something to call to you. Use your finger as an Athame, it works just as well, and may even work better than any blade you could ever buy. If someone insists that you must use an expensive tool for your rituals, they are probably trying to sell you that tool.

Remember, Witchcraft was originally practiced by the country dwellers. These were people who didn’t have the time to search for, or the money to buy special tools for ritual. The knife they used to eat with was the same knife they used for ritual.

They understood that it’s not the tool that contains the power, it’s the Witch. The tool is simply that, a tool. This is what I meant when I said that the concept of consecrating tools specifically for use in ritual is relatively new.

So why is it that some Witches believe that they must have the shiniest, most expensive, matched set of tools? Most likely it’s ego. It’s a way to show off. If you have the money to afford the most expensive tools, you must be good.

I’ve always had issues with these type of people, because they are invariably the same people who always claim not to have any money. Perhaps if they had their priorities set right, they would have money.

Granted, for the most part, this syndrome tends to mostly afflict the new comer to the Craft. As you learn and grow in your Path, you begin to realize what is important and what is not.

You also realize that tools are just a prop used to help yourself enter the mindset for ritual. Tools are symbolic, and very useful to the Witch.

It’s just that if you are good, you find that they are not required.

There is also no requirement that you have every tool that you may ever need. Most tools serve multiple functions, and overlap other tools in those functions.

For example, the Athame, wand, sword, and staff can all be used to cast your Circle. While using a sword to cast Circle is flashy and dramatic, swords tend to be expensive and can be awkward to use.

An Athame is both less expensive and easier to use, but I would argue that a wand or staff could be more practical.

Why use a wand or staff, you ask? I’m glad you did. A wand or staff is a tool that the average person can make themselves.

The material grows locally to just about any area where there are people, and the fact that it is made of local or indigenous materials can have significant effects on the energies that are focused through it.

To make a wand or staff, you simply find a tree. Some trees have significance associated with them in some magickal traditions. You can research which trees may be more useful based on tradition, or you can use any tree.

Usually you will want to find deadfall to create your tool. You do not want to take the life of a tree to make your staff, unless you have very good reasons for doing so.

Cutting part of a limb from a live tree is allowable, but always give thanks to the tree for its sacrifice. You will probably want to leave some sort of sacrifice of your own in return.

Some Witches will poke their finger and leave a few drops of their own blood as a sacrifice.

Deadfall usually works better for making a wand or staff anyway, since you can’t really work wood while it’s green. Wood can take up to a year to dry properly.

Using dead wood found along the trail averts this. Even with dead wood, give thanks to the tree that gave it, even if you do not know which tree it came from.

This is an Earth-based, Nature-centered Path after all.

Typically you will want to remove any bark from the tool you are creating, and you may want to carve symbols or sigils into it. Some will varnish or oil the tool.

By taking the time to work with the wood and create the tool, you are imparting some of your energy into the tool. You are focusing on the goal of creating a tool, and the more energy you focus, the more magick you put into what you are doing.

Every act of creation is an act of magick. The more energy and focus you put into the creative act, the more magick you focus into the creation.

If you just buy a knife and use it as a tool, you aren’t putting any energy into its creation as a tool. This is where consecration comes in.

By consecrating the tool, you are focusing energy into and through the tool. You may also decide to carve symbols or sigils into the handle.

This again allows you to spend time working on the tool, and focusing energy on it.

When you perform the consecration on a tool, you are dedicating it to the service and worship of a deity. You are mentally and emotionally setting this object aside for use in ritual.

Some insist that a ritual tool can only be used for ritual. I’m practical enough to believe that a tool that can’t also be used for its intended purpose, isn’t a very useful tool.

There is no reason why you can’t use a ritual staff as a walking staff also, or use an Athame to cut food, if your Athame is what you have.

Should you find yourself in the situation where you must use a ritual tool to defend yourself, do it.

What I believe is more important, is how you treat the tool. A ritual tool should be treated with respect and reverence.

If you use your ritual staff to help you climb a hill, you’ll want to inspect it at the top of the hill, to make sure that it has suffered no permanent damage.

If you have to use your Athame to defend yourself, wipe any blood off the blade, or it will rust.

Again, the ancients didn’t use special tools for ritual, they used their every day tools.

Treat your tools with respect.

Consecration is a simple process, but it should take time. The purpose is to connect with the tool, and to focus energy into it.

This is not something that should be rushed.

I’ve known Witches who waited to consecrate their tools until they had everything they wanted, so they could do everything at once. This can be done, but in my opinion, it leads to rushing.

If you have several tools that you want to consecrate, you are going to spend less time with each of them, than if you have only a single tool. Also, by working with each tool in an individual consecration, you get practice in casting Circle, and working in ritual.

So to consecrate a tool, start by casting Circle. Call the Quarters, and invoke the Gods.

Once your sacred Space has been set, you will need water, salt, charcoal, and incense for the consecration. The idea is that you consecrate the tool with all four Elements.

Water is obvious, salt is Earth, charcoal is Fire, and incense is Air. You provide the Spirit.

To set up, you will want to add salt to the water, light the charcoal, and add incense once the charcoal is burning.

Typically this is done in some ritual manner. For instance, I will use my Athame as a scoop to put salt into the water. I do this three times, then stir the salt into the water.

I then charge the salt water by plunging the blade into it and focusing energy through the blade and into the water.


Visualize a blue-white light entering the water and building in intensity. Make the water glow with the energy, then say;

Creature of Water and Earth this charge I give
No evil in thy presence live
Not in complete accord with me
By powers Air, Fire, Land, and Sea,
As I do say,
SO MOTE IT BE

Draw a Pentagram in the water with the blade. Light the charcoal and allow it to burn until it glows red when blown upon.

You may want to light the charcoal before you cast Circle, in order to give it enough time to heat properly. Add incense to the charcoal, focus energy into the incense and charcoal just as with the water and salt, and say;

Creature of Fire and Air this charge I give
No evil in thy presence live
Not in complete accord with me
By powers Air, Fire, Land, and Sea,
As I do say,
SO MOTE IT BE

Again, draw a Pentagram, this time in the air above the burning incense, the tip of the vertical blade aimed down at the charcoal.

As you charge each of these, concentrate on expelling any negative or unwanted energies from the water or incense. You are consecrating the symbols of each of the four Elements.

The drawing of the Pentagram is a seal to keep the energy you have added in, and unwanted influences out. The salt water, charcoal and incense are now consecrated and ready to use in ritual.

The rhyming verse helps you to remember the words. Remember, it’s not the words that are important, it’s the intent and thought and will behind them.

You can consecrate each of the Elements individually, and then mix them together, but I find it easier to work with them after they have been combined. The preference is really up to you.

Now take the tool, whatever it may be, and hold it in your hands. Spend time feeling the tool, learning its shape and heft with your hands.

This tool is going to be something you will use without thought. You must get to know it intimately.

Hold it, touch it, caress it, whatever it takes for you to know the tool. Learn and know every curve, edge, and corner of the tool.

This part of the consecration alone may take 30 minutes or more.

After you have connected with the tool, gotten to know it as an individual, continue holding the tool and meditate on how you will use it.

See yourself using the tool in ritual. Actually practice the movements while holding the tool. Feel how the tool responds to you, and the movement.

Let the tool tell you if the movements are correct for it or not. Listen with all of your senses to the tool.

The tool must become an extension of your body. Holding the tool must feel as natural as pointing a finger. This process will also take time. Do not rush.

Now that you have made the tool a part of yourself, it is time to introduce it to the four Elements.

You do this by anointing the tool with the Elements. Small tools can be immersed in the salt and water, larger tools such as a staff or sword you will pour or wipe, or drip the salt and water onto.

This is a ritual cleansing, and must be thought of as such. You are magickally and ritually cleaning the tool with salt and water.

Be gentle, but thorough. Also be sure to completely dry the tool after, especially metal objects.

While introducing the tool to Earth and Water, keep in mind that you are cleansing and protecting the tool. You can chant a rhyme over and over if you like, and if it will help you keep the purpose in mind.

After drying the tool, now pass it through the smoke of the incense. You will probably need to add more incense to the charcoal.

Watch how the smoke curls around the tool and caresses it. As before, keep in mind that you are cleansing and protecting the tool with Fire and Air.

Continue holding the tool in the smoke until you are satisfied that it has been thoroughly cleansed and protected. Trust yourself to know.

If you choose, you can dedicate the tool to a specific God and or Goddess after you have introduced it to the Elements. You can also just say “The Gods”, if you do not have specific Deities chosen.

Simply hold the tool up as an offering, and tell them that you have consecrated this tool in Their service. Again, listen with all your senses, and you will know if They wish you to know something.

After consecrating the tool, you can dismiss the and invoke the Gods.

Once your sacred Space has been set, you will need water, salt, charcoal, and incense for the consecration. The idea is that you consecrate the tool with all four Elements.

Water is obvious, salt is Earth, charcoal is Fire, and incense is Air. You provide the Spirit.

To set up, you will want to add salt to the water, light the charcoal, and add incense once the charcoal is burning.

Typically this is done in some ritual manner. For instance, I will use my Athame as a scoop to put salt into the water. I do this three times, then stir the salt into the water.

I then charge the salt water by plunging the blade into it and focusing energy through the blade and into the water.

Visualize a blue-white light entering the water and building in intensity. Make the water glow with the energy, then say;

Creature of Water and Earth this charge I give
No evil in thy presence live
Not in complete accord with me
By powers Air, Fire, Land, and Sea,
As I do say,
SO MOTE IT BE

Draw a Pentagram in the water with the blade. Light the charcoal and allow it to burn until it glows red when blown upon.

You may want to light the charcoal before you cast Circle, in order to give it enough time to heat properly. Add incense to the charcoal, focus energy into the incense and charcoal just as with the water and salt, and say;

Creature of Fire and Air this charge I give
No evil in thy presence live
Not in complete accord with me
By powers Air, Fire, Land, and Sea,
As I do say,
SO MOTE IT BE

Again, draw a Pentagram, this time in the air above the burning incense, the tip of the vertical blade aimed down at the charcoal.

As you charge each of these, concentrate on expelling any negative or unwanted energies from the water or incense. You are consecrating the symbols of each of the four Elements.

The drawing of the Pentagram is a seal to keep the energy you have added in, and unwanted influences out. The salt water, charcoal and incense are now consecrated and ready to use in ritual.

The rhyming verse helps you to remember the words. Remember, it’s not the words that are important, it’s the intent and thought and will behind them.

You can consecrate each of the Elements individually, and then mix them together, but I find it easier to work with them after they have been combined. The preference is really up to you.

Now take the tool, whatever it may be, and hold it in your hands. Spend time feeling the tool, learning its shape and heft with your hands.

This tool is going to be something you will use without thought. You must get to know it intimately.

Hold it, touch it, caress it, whatever it takes for you to know the tool. Learn and know every curve, edge, and corner of the tool.

This part of the consecration alone may take 30 minutes or more.

After you have connected with the tool, gotten to know it as an individual, continue holding the tool and meditate on how you will use it.

See yourself using the tool in ritual. Actually practice the movements while holding the tool. Feel how the tool responds to you, and the movement.

Let the tool tell you if the movements are correct for it or not. Listen with all of your senses to the tool.

The tool must become an extension of your body. Holding the tool must feel as natural as pointing a finger. This process will also take time. Do not rush.

Now that you have made the tool a part of yourself, it is time to introduce it to the four Elements.

You do this by anointing the tool with the Elements. Small tools can be immersed in the salt and water, larger tools such as a staff or sword you will pour or wipe, or drip the salt and water onto.

This is a ritual cleansing, and must be thought of as such. You are magickally and ritually cleaning the tool with salt and water.

Be gentle, but thorough. Also be sure to completely dry the tool after, especially metal objects.

While introducing the tool to Earth and Water, keep in mind that you are cleansing and protecting the tool. You can chant a rhyme over and over if you like, and if it will help you keep the purpose in mind.

After drying the tool, now pass it through the smoke of the incense. You will probably need to add more incense to the charcoal.

Watch how the smoke curls around the tool and caresses it. As before, keep in mind that you are cleansing and protecting the tool with Fire and Air.

Continue holding the tool in the smoke until you are satisfied that it has been thoroughly cleansed and protected. Trust yourself to know.

If you choose, you can dedicate the tool to a specific God and or Goddess after you have introduced it to the Elements. You can also just say “The Gods”, if you do not have specific Deities chosen.

Simply hold the tool up as an offering, and tell them that you have consecrated this tool in Their service. Again, listen with all your senses, and you will know if They wish you to know something.

After consecrating the tool, you can dismiss the Quarters and open Circle. You have now dedicated the tool into the service of the Gods.

You will probably need to eat or drink something. This ritual will fatigue you, if done correctly.


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